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How To Get Equestrian Sponsorships

Long associated with the rich and upper class, equestrians are in luck when it comes to finding sponsors. Due to the fact that most of the sponsors are gearing their products to the wealthy, they expect to get a lot in return. This is good news for you, as they are more likely to offer you more. When money is at stake, thereís always risk involved, so be sure to get everything in writing. Sponsorship agreements are common, so donít just take anyoneís word Ė get everything written, signed, and sealed.



1. Festivals are a good place to start looking for sponsorships. Where thereís a fair, there are often horses, sometimes even ponies. Since people are needed to take care of the animals, you can offer your help. Summer would obviously be the best time to help out at festivals, but you can also find events in the fall, especially in October, when children go out to the pumpkin patches. Local fair grounds are probably your best bet when trying to find out about all the festivals that are taking place near you. You could also try contacting your county for more information. You might consider traveling a bit during the summer as many cities hold their own Taste Festivals. Not only is this a good way to meet people in charge of festivals, but itís also good to meet the breeders as well.

2. Breeders are good people to network with. Though itís probably not very likely that a breeder is simply going to give you a horse, you could arrange an exchange to benefit you both. Since horses need care and exercise, breeders are likely to offer you the chance to come out and take care of the horse for a couple of days. In exchange you would get the chance to ride the horse and practice various jumps. Persistence really pays off and this has never been truer here. Be prepared to ask around and contact a couple of breeders before one agrees to help you out. If you have references or a sponsorship agreement, that would probably help you out as well.

3. Like breeders, trainers are good to know. Getting the chance to apprentice with a highly skilled trainer will not only open up contacts with you, but it will also help you manage the horse better than before. While you might be able to contact a trainer yourself, it would probably be better to be introduced to one. The contacts you made at the fairs and festivals that you go to will prove to be priceless in this aspect. Breeders should be able to help you out as well and put you in touch with some of their trainers. Donít think that working with a trainer will be a cakewalk, most of them are strict and tough, both with the horses and the people they work with. Just stick to it and youíll find that your hard work will pay off.

If youíre ready for lots of hard work with the potential for great rewards, consider finding more about equestrian sponsorships. You can find lots of information in our equestrian sponsorship package. Contact one of our sponsorship consultants for more information.

Below is a thai equestrian club seeking sponsorships:

Information about the 2010 World Equestrian Games sponsorships:

 


 

 

 

 

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